Introducing Research.ly, Analytic.ly and PeopleBrowsr

People I have shown Research.ly to are often shocked.  “What?! It has the data on every tweet?” Yes. Everything you have put out there. Over three years worth. And it can take that and slice and dice it anyway you want:  positive or negative sentiment, gender, location, top retweeters, who made the first tweet on a trending topic. It is one of the new platforms developed by the team at PeopleBrowsr.

When I showed it to one clinical researcher in the office the response was ‘I am never going on twitter, ever.’  ‘People presume they are having a private conversation, albeit in a social space – they don’t expect to be tracked, comments analyzed and remembered’.  Well, what goes online stays online and these are powerful platforms.

Research.ly

What does Research.ly do? It is a search engine and analytic tool for social media and it’s very good for those topics that get a lot of conversations happening. For example a new clothing store – Zara, has just opened in Sydney – and instantly you can find out who is talking about it, where, and top proponents of the store.

Zara researchly

Viral Analytics Platform

Let’s take that a step further.  Research.ly translates that data as a Viral Analytics Platform. You can just as easily search for a peak in conversation over the last three years and find out what was being said using the datamine.  Take for example the case of the dating site eharmony.  They had a spike of online conversation over a year ago in January 2010.

Click on the spike and it takes Research.ly seconds to find the conversations about a discrimination lawsuit against eharmony (for excluding gays and lesbians).  Using the datamine, eharmony can see exactly what was said, who said it and the sentiment. Top right of the screen you can search other topics like this years South by South West.

eharmony viral analytics

The platform also slices and dices the conversations by community and builds a score card – so that you can see who the top 15 communities are that are positively mentioning a brand.  The communities are defined by looking at people’s twitter bios – in other words how people define themselves.

And then it takes the top three communities and finds those people within them who are the very top positive influencers for the brand.  What does that mean? That a company can find it’s top advocates – champions.  These people will create a good online conversation for them – and that worth a lot of bucks to some companies.

Customise Viral Analytics

Let’s take that a step further. The Viral Analytics platform can be customised – in this case CocaCola get realtime data of the conversations across twitter, facebook (pages), blogs… for any number of accounts and keywords and they can also export the data. They can do the same for the competition, in this case Pepsi, RedBull,  Dr Pepper. The team have also just added (this is very new) – a workspace tab –  you can look at who is tweeting within your company.  This is a very powerful tool indeed.

So, PeopleBrowsr platforms – real-time data, a social search engine.  That remembers, tracks and analyses.